SPORTS
MEDICINE

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Pain and injuries are part of most athletes' lives. The dedicated sports medicine specialists at CTPO are here to make sure those injuries interfere as little as possible with our young athletes.

 

Whether your child is having pain while competing, has sustained an overuse injury, or has suffered a ligament tear or cartilage injury, our sports medicine team is here to get your child back in the game.
 

WHAT IS A PEDIATRIC SPORTS MEDICINE SPECIALIST?


A pediatric sports medicine specialist is someone who is specifically trained to take care of young athletes. They usually have completed an orthopedic surgery residency as well as a pediatric orthopedic surgery fellowship. Some complete a second fellowship in sports medicine or receive additional training during residency and fellowship in sports medicine. Pediatric sports medicine specialists are active in research and quality improvement in the care of young athletes being members of international societies such as the Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America (POSNA) as well as Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine (PRiSM).

 

WHAT IS PEDIATRIC SPORTS MEDICINE?


Pediatric sports medicine is the treatment of young athletes from early childhood through adolescence into young adulthood. Kids are not just little adults. Children are constantly growing and their bones grow much faster than their muscles and tendons, especially during growth spurts. This can lead to injuries called traction apophysitis (such as Osgood Schlatter, Severs, etc).

 

Children also have growth plates which are areas of cartilage at the ends of bones that can be injured in sporting activities. Surgery can also be challenging in the pediatric athlete because of the presence of growth plates. The pediatric sports medicine specialists at CTPO have been trained to perform surgeries that do not injure the growth plate. Some growth plates do not fully close until 18-20 years old.

 

SPORTS INJURIES WE TREAT

Shoulder Injuries
 

  • Broken Collarbone

  • Labrum Tear

  • Little League Shoulder

  • Shoulder Instability and Dislocation

  • Shoulder Separation (Acromioclavicular Joint Separation)

  • Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior (SLAP) Tears

  • Throwers Shoulder/GIRD

Elbow Injuries
 

  • Little League Elbow

  • Avulsion Fracture of the Medial Epicondyle

  • Olecranon Apophysitis

  • Ulnar Collateral Ligament (UCL) Injury

Hip Injuries
 

  • Femoral Acetabular Impingement (FAI)

  • Snapping Hip

  • Hip and Groin Strains

  • Overuse hip conditions (such as those seen in dancers and gymnasts)

  • Pelvic apophysitis Pelvic avulsion fractures

Ankle Injuries
 

  • Ankle instability/Recurrent Ankle Sprains

  • Ankle Fractures

  • Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

  • Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Ankle (OCD)  

Knee Injuries
 

  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tears

  • Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) Tears

  • Collateral Ligament Tears (MCL/LCL)

  • Meniscus Tears

  • Discoid Menisci

  • Patellar Instability and Dislocations

  • Growth Plate Fractures

  • Tibial Spine Fractures

  • Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD)

  • Overuse Injuries:

    • Osgood Schlatter

    • Sinding Larsen Johansson (SLJ) Syndrome

    • Anterior Knee Pain

    • Medial Plica Syndrome

MOST COMMON
SPORTS INJURIES

TIPS FOR PREVENTING CHILD & ADOLESCENT SPORTS INJURIES

Kids aged 5 to 14 account for 40% of sports injuries treated in hospitals each year. Below are 10 tips to help keep your kids in the game and out of the ER and clinic. 

 


PREPARE

  • Get a pre-participation sports physical with your PCP or through yearly events offered by the Travis County Medical Society at 512-206-1249. 

 


WARM-UP & COOL-DOWN

 

  • Start with walking, cycling, or jogging and then add some stretching. Stretching involves going just beyond the point of resistance.

  • Stretches should be held for 20-30 seconds – no bouncing! 

 

HYDRATE

 

  • Your child should not wait until they’re thirsty to drink water. Pre hydrate with 5-8oz.

  • Kids under 90 lbs should drink 5oz every 20min. Kids over 90 lbs need 8oz every 20min.

  • Water, for activities under 1 hour, and non- sugar-containing sports drinks, for longer activities, should be the primary source of hydration for children and teenagers. 

 


REST

  • Lack of sleep and muscle fatigue predispose an athlete to injury.

  • The most common injuries in young athletes are overuse injuries — too many sports and not enough rest.

  • Kids should also take 1-2 days a week and 3 months a year off from athletic activities to decrease overuse injuries. 

 

EAT A WELL-BALANCED DIET 

 

  • Eat a well-balanced diet of fruits, vegetables and lean proteins, and maintain a regular eating schedule. 

 


EQUIPMENT

 

  •  Make sure your child has appropriate protective equipment and check the fit - especially for helmets, mouth guards, and cleats/shoes. 

CROSS-TRAIN

 

  • Play different sports or cross-train during the “off-season” and avoid playing one sport year-round, so that the same joints and muscles are not continuously overused.

  • This will help decrease overuse injuries and develop other skills while maintaining fitness. 

 

 

LEARN PROPER TECHNIQUES & GUIDELINES

 

  • For example, football players should be taught the proper way to tackle an opponent to avoid a neck injury or concussion, and baseball players should be taught the proper way to throw and follow the guidelines on pitch counts. 

 


LISTEN

 

  • Kids should not “play through the pain!” They need to listen to their bodies and decrease training time or take a break if they have pain. 

RECOGNIZE TROUBLE

  • Your child should see a doctor if he/she has: 

    • Consistent pain during or after sports 

    • Persistent or new swelling around a joint 

    • Recurrent instability - joints "give way" 

    • Painful pops (non-painful pops are OK) 

    • Pain that does not respond to a period of rest

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